A guide to the SQL Insert into Statement

A guide to the SQL Insert into Statement
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To insert a record in a table you use the INSERT INTO statement.

You can do it in two ways, if you want to insert values only in some columns, you have to list their names including all mandatory columns. The syntax is:

INSERT INTO table_name (column1, column2, column3, ...)
VALUES (value1, value2, value3, ...);

The other way is inserting values to all columns in the table, it is not necessary to specify the columns names. The syntax is:

INSERT INTO table_name 
VALUES (value1, value2, value3, ...);

Here’s an example inserting a record in the table Person in both ways:

INSERT INTO Person
VALUES (1, ‘John Lennon’, ‘1940-10-09’, ‘M’);

And

INSERT INTO Person(Id, Name, DateOfBirth, Gender)
VALUES (1, ‘John Lennon’, ‘1940-10-09’, ‘M’);

Some SQL versions (for example, MySQL) support inserting multiple rows at once. For example:

INSERT INTO Person(Id, Name, DateOfBirth, Gender)
VALUES (1, ‘John Lennon’, ‘1940-10-09’, ‘M’), (2, ‘Paul McCartney’, ‘1942-06-18’, ‘M’),
(3, ‘George Harrison’, ‘1943-02-25’, ‘M’), (4, ‘Ringo Starr’, ‘1940-07-07’, ‘M’)

Note that the entire original query remains intact - we simple add on data rows encloded by paranthesis and separated by commas.