A Little Reassurance

A Little Reassurance
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I struggle some what with remembering things, so I fear that my memory shall impede my ability to learn coding. Plus, even in the beginning lessons provided by freecodecamp I sometimes have a tough time. But I truly love coding. Do you think I shall be able to do this? Have any of you experienced similar problems and did you still make it? I would appreciate some support. Thank you!

I have absolutely garbage memory and I still do okay!
Even the most experienced coders don’t remember everything. You’ll retain what you use the most and forget the rest - and that’s fine! You’ll get a basic understanding of how different languages work with FreeCodeCamp’s curriculum, and that’s more than enough to be able to find the right syntax for your code - even if you need to google it!

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Wow! You are so right! What a silly I am to worry. And thank you so much! You made me feel so much better. :relaxed: :slightly_smiling_face: :relieved: My future looks brighter every minute!

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I am so glad you are feeling positive about this now! You are always welcome to reach out to me if you need reassurance. :heart:

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I think remembering something is not really a problem.
I do n’t speak English, but I can still write a little code :laughing:

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Thank so much! :heart: :heart: :heart: :grinning: :grinning: :grinning: :+1: :+1: :+1:

All of you guys are so supportive. My confidence is now going through the roof! thank you! A toast to coding and coders!

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I’m a professional developer. There are things I use often enough that I know them like I know basic arithmetic, but mostly my skills rest in the fact that I Google like the wind.

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At my first dev job, I got really discouraged that I wasn’t creating enough code for the company as soooo much time was used up researching solutions, easily half. When I spoke the director, he laughed and said, everyone uses half their time researching solutions. Even after you “master” a language, the language will change and with it, best practices will change, too, and that’s just the start. Then you use one language for this, and one for that, and several languages actually on the same line (my personal best is four, but I’m only in my second year). With so much to know in regards to the details, those become less important/impossible to remember them all. It is the concepts that really matter. Learn one language, and the rest are easy, to the point that you now know what questions to ask. Prior to learning that first language, you didn’t know that you have a list and a linked list, so you didn’ t know when to use which, and you didn’t know how to ask Google what the syntax is for creating a using a linked list in this new language you are using. You are good. My personality analysis says I am not detail-oriented. Code IS detail, but, meh, so I troubleshoot a bit more than some, but my algorithms are sweeeeet. What do all happy coders have in common? We can all say, “But I truly love coding.”

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Yes. Coding has made me a MUCH better researcher.

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That is totally awesome! I’m really glad I chose coding for my future if only to have such a wonderful and supportive community of coders. :heart:

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My memory is… what were we talking about? The thing about it is, your brain is going to GO, and what I mean is, if it’s not bogged down with RAM remembering everything, then I’ve got good news for you, it means that your brain will use its energy in other ways, creative ways! People like us are some of the most creative, I believe, people, and because of this, we can, do, and will create some of the best ideas, not only for websites, apps, programs, but also businesses, that’s why people like us make such great entrepreneurs, as well as highly valuable creative assets to teams! I learn by doing something over and over. I like freeCodeCamp, but one thing that’s really helped me is YouTube tutorials that actually walk you through building something, so you can build it while you watch, (watch part, pause, code, watch part; or watch full, go back and watch part, pause code, watch part; however you want to do it.) I struggle with sometimes getting too excited about something, so I try and stay even keel, level headed, emotionless(to a degree), this also allows me to think more logically and clearly, and when I get to a bump, I’m not “brought down” from a euphoric optimism high. I really have to try and keep my feet on the ground where the rubber meets the road, that’s where the paydirt is. I tend to be up in the clouds where all the ideas are. Ideally I go up in my hot air balloon and get an idea, then come back down to earth and execute it, the only thing is, it’s REALLY FUN to be way up high in the clouds with all the ideas (at least for me,) then when I get my feet back on the ground that’s where the grind is, so you’ve got to learn to love the grind, I think for people like us, if we can love the grind, we’ll be divine, haha.

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In my opinion, memorizing A LOT of things is not that important in terms of software development.

What is more important is learning concepts and applying them specific to your application. Unlike biology where facts are very clear. In engineering/software development, there are a lot more variables on why you would choose a certain design pattern, technology, etc.

My memory sucks as well but that’s why as software devs we have google :slight_smile:

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