Does FCC really land a job?

Does FCC really land a job?
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Hi, and thanks in advance for reading.
I am a student at Texas A&M International University, and I will be graduating May 2020. The only problem is I wasted my early years in an abusive relationship. I didn’t do internships, and dropped out of honors. I will have a decent GPA upon graduation. Now, I have eight months make up for all that. I have two options, either I try to pass the FE exam to be an engineer-in-training and hope someone will hire me off of that license, or I try FCC and hope to get a Software-Engineering job. I really want to be a Software Engineer, but the allure of the FE is that it is a state-license hence more job-security presumptuously… If I devote the next eight months to completing the first 1,800 hours of FCC curriculum, will it really land me a job? I cannot afford to waste time, I need to pay back student loans.
I am highly skeptical that it is possible to get a job off of 8 months of training especially when many college graduates are having a hard time landing jobs! (myself included) I find it so hard to believe, but this could be my one hope to redeem my mistakes! My Bachelors will carry some weight, but honestly college feels like such a scam…

I don’t think the certificates themselves will land you the job. If you go hard and don’t quit, you will land a job.

There is no magic pill. You’re going to fail. You’re going to be denied. You’re going to be ignored. You’re going to feel like giving up. Just keep your head up. Keep moving forward.

I would recommend the following:

  1. study, practice, study, practice. Repeat everyday. Make sure to take breaks, but never stop learning and practicing.

  2. build a your portfolio of work. Commit to github 3-5 times a week. The FCC projects will make great addition to your portfolio.

  3. apply for jobs, but also apply for an internship or a contract position they’ll help you land a engineering job. You may convert at the company you intern/contract with. Regardless, you will have real engineering experience on your resume.

  4. you should still be repeating #1

I’m currently working at Google as a engineer under contract. A lot of my colleagues are encouraging me to convert to a full-time employee. I’m not a math or CS genius. I’m a hard worker. I’ve worked there for almost 2 years and I may not convert if I don’t pass the Google interview. I feel stupid most days, but I would never trade the experience I’ve had. I have learned so much.

Being a software engineer requires ongoing learning and growth.

Like I said, never stop moving forward, no matter how much you feel like giving up or you are told no. Learn to enjoy the process. And most important of all, BUILD COOL STUFF. The jobs will find you.

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I think since you’re still in school and have the time and ability to still take the FE exam that could potentially land you an engineering job, it may be prudent to exercise that option while it’s directly in front of you. If it doesn’t pan out, FCC and the wealth of other DIY resources are great fall-back options, but avoid pinning your hopes on any one thing.

Versatility, adaptability, and learning how to learn (quickly) are vital skills to keep up with a market that is constantly in flux; try one path, if it doesn’t lead anywhere (or to where you hoped), shift gears and pick another one. Rinse + repeat until you find something that fits.

Also good to keep in mind that it’s not what you know, but who you know. A certain amount of technical ability is required, to be sure, but interpersonal proficiency and networking (aptitudes that are becoming increasingly scarce as people become dependent on devices for connection instead of socializing) will get you further a lot quicker than endlessly throwing resumes into the abyss and hoping for interviews, regardless of what sector you want to break into.

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Really, neither college nor freeCodeCamp can guarantee that you’ll land a job in the field you trained for.

All you can do is make a decision and commit to seeing it through. The good news is that there is always time to course correct if you decide you made the wrong step. No decision you make right now will lock in your career forever.

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Great advice, and thank you! I will definetely keep tryin, but the college loans will be a huge burden. I will just try no matter what. After all, being a first generation student, just graduating from college is a huge accomplishment all by itself! Many kids don’t even get this far. Congratulations on your Google experience! I envy you!

You are right. Still, I need stuff to put into my resume/portfolio and my major did nothing to that end. I suppose FCC is my best bet at the moment to that end. If it doesn’t work out for Software, at least I will have something to show even in Systems applications. The reverse can not be said for the FE, and honestly I doubt I would be happy sticking with Systems anyway. Suppose I will try my chances with FCC and stick wit that, thanks!

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