GitHub: The "Yowza, that’s a lot of files. Try again with fewer than 100 files." Error Help

GitHub: The "Yowza, that’s a lot of files. Try again with fewer than 100 files." Error Help
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#1

I’m familiar with Github but still getting used to the ins and outs of it.

Background:
I’ve worked on one project with a group using Visual Studio with the GitHub extension to pull, push, and whatnot within Visual Studio. We have completed the project months ago but I want to add the project to my newly created professional GitHub account to use as my portfolio when applying for jobs. In my organization’s repository for the project, I have downloaded the zip to my desktop and extracted the files.

My Problem
Now, on my professional GitHub account, I made a new repository for my completed group project. I tried dragging the extracted project folder to my repository and the error message, as stated in the title, popped up. Why was my organization’s repository able to hold those files but my newly created repository can’t? How do I go about adding my group project to my repository?

#2

I’m not familiar with the Visual Studio GitHub extension, but have you tried adding via the git command line? git remote add origin <repo url> followed by git push origin <branch> should do it (assuming the repo is currently empty).

#3

@lionel-rowe I’m not familiar with Git as my group project was introduced to GitHub. How do I access the git cli? Is the cli linked with my GitHub account?

#4

Open a terminal and type git to check you have it installed. Then cd to the directory of your project. Type git status to check it’s a git repository (if it doesn’t display an error, then you’re good).

  • git remote add origin <repo url> will add your GitHub repo as a “remote”, i.e. somewhere online you can push changes to.
  • git push origin <branch> will push to the relevant branch.

Make sure to replace the <arguments> with your relevant URL/branch.

#5

If you are using npm packages you aren’t going to want to put all those in your repository.

If your using github you probably should know how to use git to track the files you need to but not all of them need tacking nor should you upload your entire project folder usually.

Many are often excluded by adding them to a .gitignore file and usually include installed packages stored in the node_modules/ folder, settings for your IDE such as linter configs, and credentials that you might store in a file.

The unnecessary files won’t be tracked and they won’t be added to your repository when you push them to it.

#6

Many are often excluded by adding them to a .gitignore file and usually include installed packages stored in the node_modules/ folder, settings for your IDE such as linter configs, and credentials that you might store in a file.