I'm irritated with web development. Should I reconsider being a programmer?

I'm irritated with web development. Should I reconsider being a programmer?
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#41

@Nimp just see cs50 on edx and after that
decide what you want and you can before cs50 study python from python for everybody from coursera


#42

@vytautas-pilk
do you mean what i say about js or cs50 or responsive design is not programming
i will talk about the 3
responsive web is not programming : you can say it is programming language
actually i new some say that but for me like the majority i don’t see them like that so it is an opnion
js : if you see python php java c c++ any other language you will see js for object
and errors is just mad i mean this language just make something like classes in es6
before that you made functions to make objects and prototyping and you must
set the method in prototype and you can manipulate the the prototype
of object how that and object is dict or hashmap but also object
and errors this language doesn’t have errors you can make anything
and in most cases return undefined or other object and i can understand that
it is in the browser so no one want browsers crash for programmer mistake
but the real point js is very diiferent from other programming languages
and won’t help you after that to understand any other language so
start with python or any c syntax then study js if you want to work in web
you must use it and even if you will work in iot you probably need it
but for learning programming no
courses i mention:
for cs50 and programming languages from coursera
just search for them and you will see
and if you respond for this i will not answer you until tomorrow i will go to sleep right now
so bey


#43

The Teach Yourself CS page has tremendously useful contents:
https://teachyourselfcs.com


#44

OK, so I’m sold on taking the cs50 course on Edx, but it says I have to pay $90 for the certification. I’m willing to try and get together $90 for that, but before I do, does the certificate that I get from the end of the course help at all?


#45

No, you don’t need the certificate. The class is the important bit, and that’s free.


#46

That’s right
They are different, talent.


#47

I really wish I could change the title. I don’t really hate web development, I guess it’s just that it isn’t quite in my interests, although it’s kind of linked to them. I need to take time to refocus myself to see what I am really after.

If I remember correctly, I originally got into programming because I liked how it can do great things with robotics, and I started learning web development because it was the very first thing taught on FCC, and I figured I had to start somewhere, and maybe I could use the web development skills I learn to make some quick cash doing freelance work on Upwork.

Now that I’ve been focused more on programming and doing web development, I’ve rediscovered why I like robotics and electrical workings so much and why I was interested in it back in college, but didn’t have the courage to pursue it as a career then.

Now I’m kind of getting lost in what is an overwhelming crossing of disciplines and, things, and am kind of losing sight to my main goal: Learning web development and being a freelance web developer for money.

Now personally, I think my personal interest in robotics, circuitry, tools, household appliances, and computers is more fulfilling than web development, but I don’t see anything wrong with becoming a web developer if I can enjoy it or tolerate it and make money with it.

Web development may be a pain in the butt at first and forever, but I can at least see the results of what I am doing real time, and hopefully make money from it some day, which is why I am learning it.


#48

The thing I hated then (well, had a hard time with, and still do) is people who are so one-dimensional that that is their sole interest, and honestly they are not so good at whatever it is. Programmers who want you to tell them how to do a thing.

Yeah, I thought I hate programming, but I actually am loving it. I previously worked for projects to projects and just worked together with my friends or colleagues. But for several months, I’ve been working with new people, ongoing project, but the current code base are really sloppy. It’s written in Golang but using some Java/PHP frameworks structures and that made bewildered.

The worst, the live app even doesn’t have a single documentation and anything regarding on how current system works. :unamused:


#49

I’m considering myself not a web developer but a system developer. To be honest, I really want to learn full-stack web development (because there’s so many demand for it, yeah it’s money farm) but I don’t know why I can’t.

I have done Android project, I’ve written API server with Nim, Golang, and Node.js. Done Arduino project and designing sensor for interactive gaming apps project. And what I can tell most, I’m really enjoying coding something close to hardware.

Since you’re same with me, you should keep learning web development (because it’s money farm :wink: ) so you can pay your bill, buy some hardware to play with (trust me, you need money to buy things for hardware development), and also to keep yourself be confidence because there’s satisfaction after working on anything to completion (yeah, anything ).


#50

Well where do you suggest I continue learning web develop? When do I begin making money?


#51

I’m not a web developer because I had a basic of software/hardware (as sub-credits) in my school, hence I dived easily into programming.

If in case you have no basic, you should continue with JavaScript first, learn a systematic problem-solving through coding. Coding emphasize of logical thinking, which should be able to alleviate your irritation toward web development.

Learning Node.js is good entrance to learn deeper about server, before you learn more about things that compose the web (like protocol, socket, connection, etc)


#52

Oh. You’re talking about learning more back-end things. I’ll continue to learn Javascript, but I thought ayman discouraged learning Javascript first, and it seems like a lot of people are encouraging me to learn Python instead. What’s your opinion?


#53

Yes, that’s good too, actually I learned Python first before JavaScript.

Since I thought you want directly learn web thingy while not irritated a lot hence I suggested JavaScript, but if you’re into (general) programming, yeah, Python is definitely good choice.

Python is good choice because of vast libraries it has which should save you a lot of time when doing something.


#54

Idk. Maybe I"ll work on knocking out that computer science course first, then continue with the Javascript thing here on FCC.

I only want to learn Javascript because there’s this cool robotics game that I love that uses a programming language that’s almost completely identical to Javascript. I haven’t seen anything of interest yet that uses Python.


#55

Good luck, another important part is keep practicing :slight_smile:
your effort won’t betray you :smile:


#56

Before throwing in the towel on web development, try JavaScript. It’s a game changer. That said, sure there are all kinds of services to help people make a website, but for truly custom solutions, or to make those web publishing services, you still need a developer. Those services have been around as long as the internet, and yet, they still haven’t taken our jobs. Seems like that’s proof positive this is a job that’s going to still be worth pursuing if you still have the interest.


#57

So be it. I’m gonna have to decide how to manage my time, though. I want to dive right into Javascript right now, but I also think that course on Edx will be beneficial in the long-run.


#58

You should ask yourself why you hate it or what you hate about it. If it’s that you hate the PROCESS of coding, then maybe you shouldn’t do software development. If you only hate the final product, I would say that’s not so important.

As mentioned by others, you have to love the process of problem solving. With all its tedious parts. Solving problems by thinking and doing plus patience plus persistence is what you need.

Try Javascript and see if you like it. Or go to Codeacademy and do the Python or Java course there. There’s a lot more than web development in the software scene.

But again: If you find out FOR SURE that you hate the process of coding, you shouldn’t go on. Software development is incredible complex and progressing far too fast to be able to do it without loving it, or liking it at least.

But be also careful. Could also be a temporary mood. Give it a chance for a while and see what happens.


#59

Don’t worry. You are not alone. CSS really is a pain in the arse and there are plenty of developers who dislike it. CSS rules might seems simple, but they combine together in baffling ways. And there is often no easy logical process for thinking about layout problems. They require a lot of of experience and a lot of trial and error.

Leave it for a while, and move on to JavaScript. If you have the same feelings about that after giving it your best shot, then you are probably not destined for this career.


#60

Well, I’ll say this:

I’ve been taking about a week-and-a-half off from doing programming training to try online transcription work. Although I think I could have a knack for it and make great money anywhere doing transcription work, I find it very challenging and tiring to try and accurately transcribe rough audio and accents. I’m only doing it because I believe I can be good at it, and it’s what’s making me money RIGHT NOW, which I’m hurtin’ for.

I only am able to make about $10 - $20 for every 2 - 4 hours of work because I’m so slow and new at it, and I’m trying to double-check to not make mistakes, but I’ve heard that some people are so good and fast at it, they make $500 a week from it. With that much money, I don’t have to become a programmer as a job, it can just be a hobby and a skillset.

Still, now that I’ve tried web development and transcription work, if I had to choose which one I had the most excitement doing, I’d probably say web development. Simply because I’m learning so many other things while doing it, and there’s not the same level of pressure as there is with the transcription job I’ve got.

With the transcription job, I have to transcribe hours worth of audio, and make sure every bit of it is accurate to the guide, and I’ll get a grade for it afterwards. If my rating drops too low after a certain level, I get my account locked. I don’t see many other transcription jobs available on the internet other than Rev.

Whereas, I get the impression that with developing a website or app, I can at least test it to see if it works and see it develop in real time, and I can show it to my client to see if it’s what they want before submitting my work and getting paid.

If it wasn’t for this out-of-control bank overdraft situation and some expenses in my household, I’d be going back to focusing on programming full-time. Transcription may be a way of making money from anywhere, but it’s just one narrow skillset. Whereas I can see myself doing several useful things with programming.