Junior Developer who could not get things done

Junior Developer who could not get things done
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#1

What if you are working as a Developer and could not get all the things done. I mean most Developer told me that they don’t expect that a junior is able to build things from scratch, but what is acceptable. Asking a lot would be freaking annoying and working to slow as hell will give them the feeling that this person is not ready for the real world project.


#2

Pump up your game.

Assuming your tasks are fair and adequate for your level, you are not finishing it in time because the time is being spent learning and researching (or slacking, not judging here :slight_smile: ). .

What to do then? Get better!! Keep practicing and perfecting the practice. Don’t ask your coworkers things that are easily found online.

IMHO, it’s acceptable if your progress can be perceived, for example, maybe you can’t deploy anything alone yet, but you got better in using the tools used by the team, or you understood the main issues of a project, etc.


#3

One of the most difficult things to get right during your first 6 months(ish) at a company is to find balance between floundering too long before asking for help and not being independent. That’s true for developers at all levels. I just said it’s one of the most difficult things, so obviously people aren’t getting fired for asking too many questions. You might get asked by your manager something like “How can we make you feel more confident to work independently?” or “Let’s find a way to make it easier for you to get help when you need it.” That’s fine. Take that opportunity.

I hate starting a new job because I spend months second-guessing myself and afraid that I’m not learning fast enough, that I’m too slow, making stupid mistakes, needing too much help. It’s nerve-wracking and stressful, no matter how smart you are.

Really though, you aren’t expected to be a fully independent team member right out the gate. The important thing isn’t that you know everything that you need to, but that you are showing that you are learning everything you need to. The only times I’ve heard of there really being a problem where managers consider letting a new developer go is when it quickly becomes obvious that they just don’t have enough of a background/understanding of the core principles/technology.