Need advice - I've been told that web development will be a dead career

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Yes ! :smiley: i agree with you , i love learning things and i hope to pick up maths along the way as i havent done it for 7 years thank you for your encouragement. I hope to land my feet in a development job and continue learning.

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Appeal to Authority
n. An assertion deemed true because of the position or authority of the person asserting it

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Thank you for your advice and keep that in mind. But out of curiousity , what does learning react native got to do with firebase o.O. Isnt react native just a framework for developing on cross plat mobile apps. Its nothing related to backend APIS or am i mistaken here ?

I misspoke. I wanted to get back to work quickly. I meant that it will cut down the amount of time I have to spend refactoring some key pages into React Native. Like most things with automation, it reduces but does not eliminate my work. Since the mobile app I want to build is a companion to a fully-featured website, being able to simplify the tasks I wanted the app to do (get analytics, communicate with google products) will be made far easier. I planned on a minimal interface that I can brute-force my way to rather than learning the whole framework in and out.

People keep saying this about almost every profession, how they are all going to be replaced by computers. So instead of worrying about what is going to happen in 10+ years, I decided not to listen to these voices.
Besides this there are so many people making money (and often good money) by doing “outdated” things. Calligraphers are in great demand for example, it’s really trendy nowadays to have hand written wedding invitations even though they could just print it out for the fraction of the cost. Or there are horse breeders and trainers even though we have cars, there are artists paid to make illustrations with traditional techniques like watercolor instead of using a computer, others are making a living creating medieval style manuscripts etc. If those people can make money I’m sure we won’t be out of jobs in 10 years.

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When I first started-- with COBOL in the 1990s, I was forever hearing how COBOL was ‘dying’… well it’s been ‘dying’ since the 1970s lol but it’s still used and in use in many larger companies. My first job was on a Y2K test team (most fun I had) and 10 years later I still was able to get Mainframe related testing jobs. Though right now I can’t seem to get hired for one to save my life; I get interviews but several factors seems to put the kibosh on it :stuck_out_tongue: .

The jobs are out there- I get 1 Mainframe tester job posting every 6 months or so like clockwork from many recruiters (yes I’ve tried applying several times). So… That said I wouldn’t really worry about programming/Web Development dying out any time soon or in 10 years.

Live for today.

I don’t mean to disrespect but is your dad worried about himself? After all, an A.I. that is capable of replacing human developers wouldn’t need architects either, right? :upside_down_face:

Anyways, looks like you’re confused, and it’s not good at all. If you’re into web development, just do it. Simple as that. Besides that, you don’t know what your future self will want to do in the upcoming years. So, I wouldn’t let hypothetical future dead ends ruin my day, and I suggest you the same.

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If I had a dollar for every IT architect that says they can automate web development and we can fire all the developers, I’d be rich.

Automation augments a job, sure, but this field is always changing, you’ve got to continue to change and learn new things to keep going in this field. A person who was a dev 10 years ago isn’t going to recognize the landscape now.

Dev is not a level 1 job. A lot people think it is but the truth is that not everyone can do it. Through a database guy one a web page and with no experience they will fail.

Deploy an AI web dev and does it account for all stacks and all browser support? How fast does it update when support is added or dropped. You can’t build such a thing to spec, because isn’t followed by most of the internet, not even Chrome which is the closest.

I see this about once a year since 1995. It comes out, it’s great, it’s obsolete in a few months. In 10 years maybe but it’s very unlikely a web dev will mean the same thing in 10 years.

Full automation works best in stable environments. The web isnt’ even close to stable.

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@Balancedsan
There are many replies already, but I’d like to contribute my two cents.

Ten years ago we had the second version of the iPhone, the 3G version which was very fast back then. The iPad didn’t exist. Websites weren’t responsive like they are now. Some had a mobile version. No cloud, no internet of things, no retina screens, etc. It seems more like twenty years to me now.

Ten years ago I couldn’t have dreamed that one day I’d write this reply in this wonderful place.

Ten years ago I worked in Mental Health Care. Now I learn how to code and I’ve already built a website for a society. I study UX as well. All of it online, on Danish and American platforms, together with many thousands of other students from all over the world.

Ten years is a very long time nowadays. The world is changing fast. No one knows what techniques, devices, programming languages, robots, AI, VR, AR or whatever else we’ll be welcoming in the coming years.

And who knows what climate change, changes in economy, global trade, demography and so on will bring us.

The only thing that’s certain is that you’ll have to get out of bed every morning to go to work for most of your future life. And that it is very likely that you’ll also keep studying for most of your working life.

You better make sure you fill your life with something you enjoy doing. And keep an open eye for all the new stuff in the next ten years and for all the opportunities that’ll come with them.

I wish you lots of fun with web development and lots of strength in making your own decisions in life.

Depends on what he means by web developer, also why he thinks cybersecurity safe from the same threat.

Automation is already a large part of the industry, but that’s very different from AI replacing the job, much less than the entire field. Web development really is larger than just building websites. My company is in the midst of migrating to a cloud-native architecture, and while individual pieces are simple and faster to write and deploy, the complexity in the design and orchestration of a reactive, resilient system still very much needs a human touch.

No offense to your father or other software architects, but because of their job is to look at the higher level design and evangelize certain technologies and practices, they are sometimes separated from the reality of people doing the day to day implementations. They often have an ideal version of how things should be, but they don’t quite account for or underestimate the tedium and all minute outliers the coders have to go through day to day. That’s been my experience.

The requirement collection process can be so tedious and obscure that even humans struggle to understand and fulfill. The same goes with debug support that developers provide when the code does go wrong or requirement changes and communications with other teams that go on during implementations. It’s not going to be as simple as feed in the requirements on one end and code spits out the other side. That may be doable for something stands alone, but in much more complex systems and it is maybe not quite as simple.

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His point of view is that cybersecurity experts are more in demand with the rise of technology, especially with the recent trend of attacks and there is a need for security expertise in all field of I.T in the industry which is higher level of work compared to web development and web development can be done cheaply by hiring developers to outsource from India, Vietnam etc, he isn’t wrong about security being important with the rise of technology, but he really overestimates the job of a security analyst who uses built-in tools in kali linux to scan for threats which is not a higher level of work compared to developers .

He isn’t the first person who has that kind of mentality that wants to cut cost by hiring cheap labor. I am from Singapore, and there are a lot of talks in my local forum that local developers are underpaid compared to the rest of the world and not many people are interested in I.T work here and hence most of the developers in companies are outsourced.

This toxic mentality of web developers is worth peanuts and can be outsourced cheaply has been circulating around for quite a while from older generation managers here. This is proberbly why he thinks that A.I can replace web developers. The problem with our developer community is that plenty who did computer science in good schools are aiming for Manager roles because they pay more which feeds on to this toxic mindset.

So there aren’t many good talents because of how a lot of companies here don’t value good coding practice, but hopefully, this mentality changes here as our govt started to push more people in coding boot camps and have heavily subsidized them.

I thank you for your encouragement and i agree that web development is larger than building websites. I hope i can land my feet in the industry and help contribute to the things built out there

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Good to hear you’ve made a decision @Balancedsan.

I’d like to share a few recent articles on web design and web development. And I’d like to share a link to the Danish online platform where I study UX.

Good luck with your studies and future career!

Robots will replace humans in everything, so let’s just stop living all together :stuck_out_tongue:

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People have been trying to “replace” developers for decades. Most of those efforts were more or less a waste of time. At the end of the day, even developing a simple website is an incredibly complicated process if you think about it. There might be AI-based tools to assist development but it will never completely replace people. I mean, we already have stack overflow, google, auto-fill, npm packages, and other things to the point that most developers barely write original code, and it’s still a growing field. Think about it, even the fact that we write in higher-level languages rather than binary or Assembly is using technology to reduce the workload of developers. The thing is, as the low-level workload decreases, we’re freed up to invent higher-level and more complicated concepts that end up consuming even more time.

Your dad seems to be speaking not from what he would do if he were in your shoes, but simply from a place of caring about you and wanting you to succeed. If you were to get replaced by AI, and he never told you, he’d feel terrible.

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Will all due respect to your father, his vision has become narrower due to specialization.

This advice sounds similar to our “Guidance Councillor” in high school telling us a career in computers would be very limiting because he read an article vaguely describing Moore’s Law and in his worldly expertise, “…well obviously they can only make computer chips so small”. This was circa 1995’ish before this darn “Information Super-Highway” really took off.

No one can perfectly predict the industry and development of technology alongside the behaviors and future desires of users and consumers.

Follow your bliss, and work your ass off… and you’ll be fine.

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So worst case scenario is that you start web dev and you are out of a job in 10 years?

So lets do the math:
First year salary: 40-80k depending
Move to a second Job after a year: 80-100k depending
Move to third job : 100-120k depending
Potentially peak here–

So thats 7 years at about 100k a year + 1-2 Years of less So you will likely be out of a job with about 500k+ dollars saved. assuming you live modestly (*because you are anticipating being out of work)

So whats the real question in my opinion ->
“Do you think you can switch to a different I.T. field with 500k dollars and 10 years experience as a web developer, with atleast 5 years experience of mid/senior level roles?”

And my answer to that is an unequivocal YES

p.s. if you are in a country that doesnt pay these rates, simply learn english and apply for jobs in germany for example.

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For what it is worth, I am in a completely different industry and the same discussions occur.

There are some very experienced “old timers” in my industry who are respected. When asked by some younger folks about what they think about X, Y or Z, some of them will respond much like your Dad. Some of the younger folks take this to heart and doubt creeps in (this has happened to me); you have so much respect for someone that you may doubt yourself and your choices because that certain someone told you “it isn’t worth it,” or, “there’s no money in it.” Meanwhile, other people are thriving in the field or endeavor.

You aren’t alone. And you have so many, many options. Keep increasing your abilities and build your skillset here.

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Web development is programming. A good Web developer is a polyglot who has mastered a lot of different technologies and concepts. It’s actually a pretty difficult pursuit and I empathize with people who are trying to transition to it as an initial career.

Career prospects are relative to your location. In the US there is strong demand for web development and I see no sign that this will be changing any time soon.

Microprocessor design and manufacturing engineering was once a strong career path in the US. Now with almost all manufacturing of high tech having moved to China, Korea and elsewhere, what was once a blue chip career is no longer in high demand in the states.

My advice to you is to get a foothold into the industry as a developer, since that career leads to opportunities across the spectrum of IT. Most good programmers can master, infosec, system administration, Devops, and network engineering, whereas, someone who is only a specialist in one of those other careers very likely would be unable to find work in any of those other specialties.

The important thing is that you are curious, and enjoy learning. IT and development have one constant – they are changing constantly. If you have strong computer science fundamentals, you will be able to adapt to the constant changes, but you need to keep learning throughout your careers and those people who fall by the wayside are often those who really never enjoyed the challenge of learning in the first place. They get burned out because you can’t sit on your laurels as a developer, but conversely that is what many people enjoy about it as a career.

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This advice is awesome. Thanks a lot

Learn the fundamentals programming which will never be obsolete. As for a dead career, your father should consider it instead to be an evolving career. frameworks come and go. The core doesn’t.

Also I’m a singaporean as well. I have a lot of friends and family who tend to speak in absolutes. Don’t be dissuaded.