Newbie Programmer schedule

Newbie Programmer schedule
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#1

Hi my name is Mike and I will be finishing up my current job in 2 weeks and wont be working during the rest of my Web Development program at Bloc and I am currently struggling with applying code to problem solving and understanding a lot of the code, so I am looking for input on my schedule I will have. Since I am not working I will have 10-12 hours 6 days a week free to work on furthering this program and my skills to finish up the program in 3-4 months and get a developer job. Any opinions on a good accurate routine outline to learn and apply programming would greatly be appreciated.


#2

Well, it sounds like you’re doing a lot of work.

I might add … as a music teacher, I often tell my students, “I wish I could go back in time and practice half as much but practice ten times smarter.” Make sure you are focused on what you want. If you aren’t learning a specific skill, then be challenging yourself by building something different. I keep a list of “Things I Should Understand Better” and revisit it often.

I am a little concerned about the line “…to finish up the program in 3-4 months and get a developer job.” Finishing a bootcamp does not automatically get you a job. There are factors like the job market in your area, how your skill set matches up with employer needs, your portfolio, your ability to sell yourself, and just plain luck. Some people do get jobs right away, but they are the exception. Most people have to struggle in a job search for a while, sometimes even a couple years.


#3

Burn out, burn out and more burn out.

I learn 1-2 hours a day. Thats as much as I can function and actually take in, any more than that and I am wasting my time and energy. I usually go and spend time on a project, or living my life doing things outside in the fresh air like taking photos or walking the dog… :slightly_smiling_face:

@kevinSmith has it right. I was grade 6 piano and a compitent drummer by the time I was 16. I was told by a fantastic teacher to practice a set amount a day and no more. For years, I would practice between half hour - hour pretty much every day and gradually I progressed. Just enough time to make me look forward to coming back to it, and not resenting having to do it.

The job hunt will not be easy. For example, in London each junior web dev job on LinkedIn gets 200+ applicants. 90% of those people are likely to be better and more experienced than you. The best you can do is try and get some freelance work when you have finished the course and build your way up from there. You will get experience, and have projects to talk about that aren’t from freecodecamp.


#4

I should have clarified more clearly I have been in the program for a some time now and the 3-4 months is what i about have left in the Bootcamp and I do have a friend who is part owner of a programming business that is looking to higher me as long as I have the minimal level needed to start with them.


#5

Just as I responded to Kevin smith I should have clarified the 3-4 months is what I have left for my Bootcamp and I actually have a friend who is part owner of a programming business who is looking at hiring me as long as I have the base knowledge they need. I am planning on doing this 10-12 hour schedule as though I did for my job since those are the hours I worked and break it up as far as practicing code, reading, video tutorials, side projects and any other forms I come across that will be beneficial. Then it will still leave me for time in the day to do all my daily activities such as working out, family time etc


#6

Well, if you’be got a friend willing to hire you, the you’re lucky. Congrats.


#7

Thank you but I will only get hired if I meet the requirements of what they need so just getting some opinions from others on sturdy efficient study habits and blocked time schedules to move forward more efficiently


#8

If I were in your shoes …

That job opportunity is golden. I would talk to your friend and ask him (or have him put you in touch with one of his coders) and ask them: What is the tech stack they want? What would they recommend you prioritize. Ask if you can see some of their code so you can see what you’re up against.


#9

Great idea I will get in touch with him and request that.