Sean MacBride tribute feedback

Sean MacBride tribute feedback
0

#1

Hi, just hoping to get some hints and tips on my tribute page. I can’t stop tinkering with it, so any advice would be greatly appreciated.Sean MacBride tribute


#2

I think your design looks great, its super clean.

Some tips:

  1. If you resize the screen and make its width smaller you’ll see that the content is too narrow, you should use a media-query and lower the margin if the screen width is below certain point.
  2. If you increase the screen width a lot, the content will expand indefinitely, imagine a point where the screen is so big that all your text would be in just one line. In general, people set a maximum width the page content can have and centralize it in the screen.

Just to give you an example of a page centralized:

.content {
   max-width: 980px;
   margin: 0 auto; /* centralize it */
}

#3

Thanks for the help. I made a couple of changes hopefully there correct.
I read somewhere that its better to design for mobile devices and then use mediaquery to polish it up for larger screens, would that be best practice or more of a preference?
Again thanks for taking the time to view my page.


#4

In mobile first you do your basic version first and improve on that for larger screens, that’s called progressive advancement.

The opposite is the graceful degradation, where you do your best in desktop design and removes stuff to make it work on mobile.

It’s a matter of preference and you should think what your users will use primarily, that’s where your focus should be.

Progressive Advancement has won the game for now as far as I can see. If UI/UX designers start a product design with its desktop version, they will inevitably want to make use of most of the advantages of the advanced end. For example, the hover effect which is supported by a cursor mouse; HD images & complex charts which can display normally only when there is a recent bandwidth. In this way, the designers will make efforts to complete an amazing desktop version and only to find it can hardly be adopted on a mobile end unless they give up a lot of beautiful ideas. If so, the mobile end version will be more like an afterthought, an incomplete product which’s been watered down.