[Solved]Can someone explain? Codecademy Mini Linter proj

[Solved]Can someone explain? Codecademy Mini Linter proj
0

#1

In the Mini Linter project one of the goals is to count the number of times that the elements of an array (overusedWords) appear in the text they provide. I worked on this longer than Dark Souls before watching their video guide. I was trying to solve it using different methods, but their solution is as follows…

let story = 'Last weekend, I took literally the most beautiful bike ride of my life. The route is called "The 9W to Nyack" and it actually stretches all the way from Riverside Park in Manhattan to South Nyack, New Jersey. It\'s really an adventure from beginning to end! It is a 48 mile loop and it basically took me an entire day. I stopped at Riverbank State Park to take some extremely artsy photos. It was a short stop, though, because I had a really long way left to go. After a quick photo op at the very popular Little Red Lighthouse, I began my trek across the George Washington Bridge into New Jersey.  The GW is actually very long - 4,760 feet! I was already very tired by the time I got to the other side.  An hour later, I reached Greenbrook Nature Sanctuary, an extremely beautiful park along the coast of the Hudson.  Something that was very surprising to me was that near the end of the route you actually cross back into New York! At this point, you are very close to the end.';
let overusedWords = ['really', 'very', 'basically'];
let unnecessaryWords = ['extremely', 'literally', 'actually' ];
const storyWords = story.split(' ');
const betterWords = storyWords.filter(word => ! unnecessaryWords.includes(word)
  );
let extremelyCount = 0;
let literallyCount = 0;
let actuallyCount = 0;
for (word of storyWords){
  if (word === 'extremely'){
    extremelyCount++;
  }else if (word === 'literally'){
    literallyCount++;
  }else if (word === 'actually'){
    actuallyCount++;
  }
};
console.log('Your overused word count is: extremely = ' + extremelyCount + ' literally = ' + literallyCount + ' actually = ' + actuallyCount + '.');

When I try to do this with

for (word of betterWords)

It counts 0 for all three variables, however when I use

for (word of storyWords)

It works and counts the words properly. The only difference between betterWords and storyWords is that betterWords is slightly shorter due to missing irrelevant words. Can someone explain why this doesn’t work? Maybe I just has the dumbs. It feels like I would never have passed this because of the tiniest nitpick in my original code (betterWords instead of storyWords).


#2

for (let ... of ...) is what you use with objects.
Change the loop to:

for (let i=0; i < storyWords.length; i++){
  const word = storyWords[i];
  if (word === 'extremely'){
    extremelyCount++;
  }else if (word === 'literally'){
    literallyCount++;
  }else if (word === 'actually'){
    actuallyCount++;
  }
};

MDN Reference; https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/for...of

And betterWords should produce zeros because you have removed them from the original storyWords.


#3

Thinking about your response it just hit me that I am using the wrong list of words to count. It wants you to count overusedWords (hence the name) and unnecessary words was already dealt with (removed). I has the dumbs indeed.
Thank you for your response!
:man_facepalming: