This is super hard so i quit

This is super hard so i quit
0

#1

i think the 2nd front end development project is a killer for newbies as by the minimal knowledge i have acquired from the challenges before it so bye i coded for a week


#2

Hey man, don’t give up! It is hard to code, and you can always skip the project for now and come back to it later, just provide a link with an empty site and move on from it.

You can also use google to search for more information if you feel like you need it.

:slight_smile:


#3

Feeling this way is normal and understandable. I imagine most people can sympathize, I know I can.

If you’re really lost, ask for help. There are plenty of people on here, and elsewhere, that are willing to help. However, learning to code through FreeCodeCamp takes a lot of initiative, motivation, and self-direction. You have to be willing to muscle through the hard times, see out additional resources, and ask for help when necessary.

For a free site that gives you lessons and the opportunity to code and have your answers checked on the spot, this is a pretty amazing site. Not to mention all the supportive community. It looks like you’ve just joined 4 days ago, that’s pretty early to just give up. Good luck with your efforts.


#4

You got to the second project after a week and you’re quitting?


#5

It is absolutely supposed to be this hard - please remember: FCC is not a course !!

Second Front-End project so I take it it’s the Weather App?

Start here: Intro to Ajax (also see their Intro to jQuery).

Then go back to FCC’s code and now try to understand what the code does.

Then look up on Youtube.

Don’t give up.


#6

i forgot to add basic 2nd front end development project


#7

It’s ok ! Maybe you need more structured content? Then check out this course (you might have to pay but maybe not).

It’s called a course but you could very well do it all in one or two days. In the meantime you’ll have gained some confidence and the habit to check stuff online and understand what you read a bit more.

And then you’ll be able to move on.

Come on, buckle up!


#8

I think a week is a bit hasty to decide to quit on something like this.

How much research did you do on your own before deciding it was too much? FCC is heavily self-driven, so you pretty much have to do learning outside of the lessons on FCC. They are more of guidelines as to how to proceed.

Did you ask for help in Gitter/Slack channels, the forum, etc.? People who are learning along with you can be a great resource.

I would give it a little more time. Not knowing the information is one thing, but you do have to be driven to find things out on your own. On the other hand, if you don’t enjoy looking for solutions and practicing, you either need a helping hand with how to find resources on your own, or this is truly not for you. Either way, try to give it more time before making a decision.

PM if you have any specific questions, and I can try to help you out if you’d like.

Good Luck!


#9

I’m pretty sure everyone understood that. Did you know that many people take much longer than a week to get to the first, let alone the second front-end project? You may not think you’re capable of this, but I do.


#10

I know how you feel. But if you can read this, please take this piece of advice: Don’t quit for good. Go away for a week or so, practice a few tutorials from Codecademy, and I would also recommend the Javascript track at teamtreehouse.com (you can get a week free trial).
Then, once you feel you grasped the basics, come back here, try a challenge or two. I bet you’ll be able to look at the challenge and at least know how to start it.
You probably think that everyone here gets it but you, but honest truth is no one here gets is at first. It takes time and patience and dedication. This is a community, we support each other, no matter what level of knowledge each one of us have.
Anyway good luck and I do hope you come back :slight_smile:


#11

Keep at it bro, don’t quit.

One step at a time, we all have these type of days but that will pass and you will be successful as you have been till now.

Quitting is not an answer, if you really want to do this. When we have to rise up, we will face resistance but the victory will be yours if you persist.


#12

If you quit that easily, then so be it. It wont get any better down the road.


#13

Hey friend! I have to disagree with you in this one. This course might be confusing in the first look, but it’s really important to use Google to help you and get over the doubts. Use the Mozilla Developer Network to find information about HTML, CSS, bootstrap, javascript and more. It contains really helpful information and awesome guides. Also, take some time to read the bootstrap documentation. I made my portfolio Today for this task, and you can check it here: http://codepen.io/michelmarechal/pen/GNxOyj.

I am studying front end for three weeks now and FCC is a great source.

Let’s go for it!


#14

Personally I think its wrong to encourage someone who quits that easy. There are a million more complicated things to learn than building the tribute page.


#15

If it were easy enough to pick up in a few days, there’d be no money in it!

If you really want to do this, stop moaning to yourself how hard it is, start googling and check out many of the excellent posts on this forum full of complimentary resources (try typing ‘resources’ in the search box and see what you get)

That’s exactly what I told myself when I felt like packing it in so I don’t feel bad posting it here for you to read either.

If you want easy, do codecademy js or treehouse… the trouble is your gonna feel great while your cracking along at expert pace but as soon as they let go of your hand you’ll be just as lost as when you started. FCC is tough love for us noobs, there’s no denying that. It’s aim is to help make developers, not just script kiddies so it doesn’t ‘hold your hand’ only to let you go when you get to a dangerous road like some other free resources. You really need to supplement your learning and it will come to you slowly but surely.


#16

Even if 99% of all encouragement everywhere is in vain, that remaining 1% makes it all worthwhile. Positivity costs nothing.


#17

i am gonna try code academy tutorials


#18

The only way I can learn for real is to actually build pages, change them, break them, re-do them and experiment.
The code exercises are just that, you will learn much more even if you put a folder on your desktop filled with files to mock up a website in your browser.
I just got done my first 2 or 3 basic algorithm challenges and have yet to finish the profile page. My tribute page has been edited 20 times since I uploaded it.
If you want to get a greater understanding of how this stuff works, try installing a WAMP or LAMP (depending on your OS)
I have a windows laptop running XAMPP so you can code for the front AND back end (when I learn more)
I Just picked up a raspberry pi 3, running their Debian clone that I am installing a LAMP and FTP to get a decent idea of what it will be like to work with a web host if needed.
Everybody learns differently, but maybe try a new approach before giving up.

P.s. Intentionally omitting defining the acronyms, if you find yourself googling WAMP then deep down you aren’t ready to give up just yet.


#19

I’d agree that the HTML and CSS for freecodecamp isn’t as extensive as it can be. And the Bootstrap portion actually takes away from what can be more indepth lessons for CSS. But, I think the point is to quickly get us to Javascript while having just enough HTML/CSS knowledge to be familiar. That said, I too wanted to get a better understanding of HTML and CSS prior to staring the 2nd project, so I took a CSS Layouts course on Lynda.com (Free through my library) and then I went through the free CSS lessons on w3schools.com. At a minimum, I’d recommend w3schools.com. It’s free and there are plenty of examples. After spending 16 study hours outside of FCC, I think I’m finally ready to start the 2nd project this weekend and then move on to Javascript…after going to PSD2HTML.com to practice coding a few of their readily available sample projects. Good luck!


#21

I can’t say that you’re wrong. No one is entitled to your energy or encouragement, and quitting after a week certainly isn’t worth anyone’s praise. There are people who have gone through tougher circumstances than the OP and managed to make the second project. Maybe I am wasting my time.

I tend to project a lot. When people ride in the back of my car, I go out of my way to make the ride as comfortable as possible because I can get intensely car sick when the driver makes jerky turns or lays on the brakes. It’s silly because almost no one gets as sick as I do, but I can’t really help it. My empathy (or perhaps just anxiety?) for what goes unsaid strongly impacts how I perceive my environment, whether that perception is true or not.

The OP may be a lost cause, but what if there are 2 or 3 lurkers who are leaning towards the same thought? They may have different reasons, like having bad school experiences that bred apprehension towards anything approaching formal logic, mathematics, and by extension, programming. What happens when they read a thread where someone is expressing their frustration? Yeah, OK, it’s whiny and counterproductive and more than a little immature, but it’s not the last time anyone is going to feel this way in our community. I know that level of self-doubt pretty intimately, and I’ve been that observer more times than I can count. If someone reads this and they may think nothing of it, then so be it. But if they see this post or another like it, and the response is simply, “Hey, you can do this”, maybe that’s all it takes to eliminate that little bit of doubt they had in themselves. Maybe that response is enough to make them at least feel more comfortable in the online community, and with their own feelings.

Or, maybe it’s just a way for me to soothe my own neuroses. Either way, it’s just a sentence or two. How much energy does that really take?