What is the best resources to learn Html5, Css3, Bootstrap etc

What is the best resources to learn Html5, Css3, Bootstrap etc
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#1

I am at FCC for about a month. I have learned a lot of front end in here. Almost reached to completion of the front end part of the course. I am realy enjoyed and excited.
But now I think it was just a brief introduction.
I decided to remake all my sites I have made so far, but in more meaningful way or using more advanced tools.
How and where(what online resources or books) did you learn advanced Html5, Bootstrap, Js, Js Frameworks, Sass(I still don’t know what is that but feel I should learn it =) etc.
Which tools to learn to become a front end ninja.
Please advice me. Thank you.


#2

I would like to know the same. I've done fcc, codeacademy, w3 code school, and others. I know that I will not know all that I need to know when I finish the fcc front end section. (I am building the tribute page right now, and my deficiencies are painfully obvious!) I am replying because I'd like to hear the advice you get. I also think that the trick is to code, code, code because I learn a lot every time that I do a new project.

Best Wishes!


#3

There’s this for CSS

I’m sure there are also posts for other subjects, but I can’t recall what they’re called.


#4

Thank-you for all of the links!


#5

The thing that I can recommend is this: https://medium.freecodecamp.com/from-zero-to-front-end-hero-part-1-7d4f7f0bff02#.g4sxaigyi
Completing every “Experiment”, as the author calls them, would make you knowledgeable of practically everything that comes up on a daily basis. :wink:


#6

I feel your pain. I read every book about web development I could get my hands on, watched every video, and I even took college classes.

I don’t know about you, but the reason I kept buying books and taking classes was

  1. I felt like there was something I was missing.
  2. I was afraid to go out on my own.

By the time I went to back to school, I knew as much about web development as the teacher. I built an automated system for submitting my assignments! Then I build two production websites for local business. It was then I had to ask the question, why am I going to school for this?

Why am I here you ask? I am here for the structure and the real world scenarios. I have not found a school that teaches sass and less, or Git, or anything that any modern developer uses.

The point is, everything we need is right here. We don’t need more books or more videos. We need to focus on what’s in front of us ( Free Code Camp ), The documentation of whatever technologies we are using and building real things that either us or other people are going to use. That’s going to be the fastest way to achieve our goals. Everything else is a distraction.

Look at the people around you in your everyday life. They are all distracted by new gadgets, net software, new tools, very few of them have completed let alone master anything, myself included. Many of us are going to spend our lives either doing the wrong thing or avoiding doing what they believe is right things for them. You know the right path, get on it, then FOCUS!


#7

I’ve tried various front-end Web development courses on Coursera, Udacity, Udemy, and Lynda in the past, and the platform I learned the most from ended up being Lynda. Their front-end Web development courses were very comprehensive, I highly recommend them. Lynda’s “Become a Front End Web Developer” path in particular is very good as it aggregates a bunch of related courses on the topic and puts them in a logical order from beginner to more advanced.

The path on Lynda I just mentioned above includes separate courses on Sass and Git. :slight_smile: There was also one course I did on Coursera that covered Less briefly, it was called Front-End Web UI Frameworks and Tools. It wasn’t as good as anything I did on Lynda, but it was certainly better than most of the others on Coursera.


#8

There is a saying, “Practice makes the master.”

You do not really need to learn more tools to become a ninja, just use what you already know until you reach a point when you feel that’s not enough because there is nothing else to learn about it (or simply you just know enough).

You will know when you get to that point when you, for example, coding CSS realise that your code is large enough, you need a way to re-use code, like same properties among many classes, you do not know how…, you Google, and you find Sass.

Now, you heard about Sass, and it’s not bad if you start to use it, but maybe you didn’t suffer with CSS long enough to find a solution. It’s the same thing with HTML5. HTML5 by it self is not really useful, it’s ugly, Bootstrap makes it pretty (to say something).

Answering your question about how and where to learn advanced stuff. I usually read the official documentation of the tool I’m using. For example, if it is bootstrap, I go to https://getbootstrap.com/ and read. I acknowledge that there are some tools with really bad or poor documentation. In that case, I Google it. There is plenty non-oficial documentation out there, web sites, and so on.

edit: I also wanted to add: https://validator.w3.org/, simply tool to check the markup of your documents (e.g, HTML5 docs). Useful when learning to code with HTML5.


#9

The best way to learn them is to BUILD.
It can be small code snippets, small side projects, some pages for friends or family, or another version of your previous FCC projects.

I love Youtube tutorials and Codepen to practice. People build really amazing stuff and share that. You can learn with them.

I use some resources to which I love coming back to while learning. You will find all of the links in the video description here:


#10

I’m in agreement with ewathedoer. Build, build, build. I can’t tell you how many folders I have containing small websites on my computer named “test”, “test_1”, “test_1a” etc… LOL

Started to learn HTML and CSS with with youtube but continued on and on with JS etc before I found FCC.

Keep the mind focused and you’ll be amazed at what you can do! We never stop learning!
Dan